infragon en tumblr Espacio para compartir cosas de interes

Por que somos pobres (1)

Por que somos pobres (1)

Nelsón Chitty La Roche

POR QUE SOMOS POBRES (1)

“el hombre necesita casi constantemente la ayuda de sus semejantes, y es inútil pensar que lo atenderían solamente por benevolencia (…) No es la benevolencia del carnicero o del panadero la que los lleva a procurarnos nuestra comida, sino el cuidado que prestan a sus intereses”

En 1776 Adam Smith publicó un libro La riqueza de las naciones…

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Martes 10/21/2014

LA UNIVERSIDAD Y SU HISTORIA

LA UNIVERSIDAD Y SU HISTORIA

Desde tiempos inmemoriales la Universidad es libertad académica y otorgamiento de títulos, el término “Universidad” se deriva del latín universitas magistrorum et scholarium, que quiere decir comunidad de profesores y académicos. Las primeras Universidades fueron Bolonia 1089 Italia, Oxfor 1096 Inglaterra, Universidad de Paris en 1150, Palencia 1208 España,…

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LA UNIVERSIDAD Y SU HISTORIA

LA UNIVERSIDAD Y SU HISTORIA

Desde tiempos inmemoriales la Universidad es libertad académica y otorgamiento de títulos, el término “Universidad” se deriva del latín universitas magistrorum et scholarium, que quiere decir comunidad de profesores y académicos. Las primeras Universidades fueron Bolonia 1089 Italia, Oxfor 1096 Inglaterra, Universidad de Paris en 1150, Palencia 1208 España,…

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¿Hacia dónde va la Ciencia Política latinoamericana? Temas de estudio y enfoques teórico-metodológicos de la investigación producida en América Latina

¿Hacia dónde va la Ciencia Política latinoamericana? Temas de estudio y enfoques teórico-metodológicos de la investigación producida en América Latina

Publicado en: http://www.condistintosacentos.com/hacia-donde-va-la-ciencia-politica-latinoamericana-temas-de-estudio-y-enfoques-teorico-metodologicos-de-la-investigacion-producida-en-america-latina/

¿Hacia dónde va la Ciencia Política latinoamericana? Temas de estudio y enfoques teórico-metodológicos de la investigación producida en América Latina

escrito por Cecilia Rocha el 23 julio, 2014…

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Domingo 10/19/2014

usnatarchives:

October is American Archives Month. To celebrate, we are highlighting our staff around the country and their favorite records from the holdings in the National Archives. Today’s staff member is Cody White, an archivist at the National Archives at Denver. Here’s his explanation of why his favorite record is a particular Purple Heart at the Truman Presidential Library and Museum:"Nearly two million of them have been issued over the years, but the story behind this particular medal is what really affected me the first time I saw it. Simply put, a distraught father who lost his son in the Korean War sent the posthumous medal, with accompanying letter, back to Truman. It’s a succinct, yet devastating letter to read and if I remember the story correctly Truman in turn kept the letter and medal close, with staff finding it in his personal office desk after he passed in 1972.""That simple display, it hits you right when you leave the gallery at the Harry S. Truman Library & Museum , knocked me out and has stuck with me since I first saw it. I can’t imagine the burden of such leadership; the stress, the second guessing, and the memories you’ll carry until you die.”"On that same trip I swung through Hannibal, where Tom tricked me into painting a fence."Image: Letter to Truman from distraught father: http://www.trumanlibrary.org/exhibit_documents/index.php?tldate=1953-00-00&groupid=5118&pagenumber=1&collectionid=korea.

(154 notas)

usnatarchives:

October is American Archives Month. To celebrate, we are highlighting our staff around the country and their favorite records from the holdings in the National Archives. 

Today’s staff member is Cody White, an archivist at the National Archives at Denver. Here’s his explanation of why his favorite record is a particular Purple Heart at the Truman Presidential Library and Museum:

"Nearly two million of them have been issued over the years, but the story behind this particular medal is what really affected me the first time I saw it. Simply put, a distraught father who lost his son in the Korean War sent the posthumous medal, with accompanying letter, back to Truman. It’s a succinct, yet devastating letter to read and if I remember the story correctly Truman in turn kept the letter and medal close, with staff finding it in his personal office desk after he passed in 1972."

"That simple display, it hits you right when you leave the gallery at the Harry S. Truman Library & Museum , knocked me out and has stuck with me since I first saw it. I can’t imagine the burden of such leadership; the stress, the second guessing, and the memories you’ll carry until you die.”

"On that same trip I swung through Hannibal, where Tom tricked me into painting a fence."

Image: Letter to Truman from distraught father: http://www.trumanlibrary.org/exhibit_documents/index.php?tldate=1953-00-00&groupid=5118&pagenumber=1&collectionid=korea.

(vía todaysdocument)

mrflibbers:

Muskrat, all done!  I might go back into this guy more later, but for now, I’m happy with this.  I mean, look at that little face!

(180 notas)

mrflibbers:

Muskrat, all done!  I might go back into this guy more later, but for now, I’m happy with this.  I mean, look at that little face!

(vía scientificillustration)

wildcat2030:

For a Better Brain, Learn Another Language - The cognitive benefits of multilingualism  - There’s a certain sinking feeling one gets when thinking of the perfect thing to say just a moment too late. Perhaps a witty parting word could have made all the difference. There is no English word to express this feeling, but the French have the term l’esprit de l’escalier—translated, “stairwell wit”—for this very phenomenon. Nor is there an English word to describe the binge eating that follows an emotional blow, but the Germans have kummerspeck—“grief-bacon”—to do just that. If we had the Swedish word lagom—which means something is just right—the English explanation of Goldilocks’ perfectly temperate soup could have been a lot more succinct. Or the term koi no yokan, a poetic Japanese turn of phrase that expresses the feeling of knowing that you will soon fall in love with the person you have just met. It’s not love at first sight so much as an understanding that love is inevitable. Keats and Byron could have really used a word like that. There are many words that English speakers don’t have. Sometimes Anglophones take from other languages, but often, we have to explain our way around a specific feeling or emotion that doesn’t have its own word, never quite touching on it exactly. “The reason why we borrow words like savoir faire from French is because it’s not part of the culture [in the United States] and therefore that word did not evolve as part of our language,” says George Lakoff, a professor of cognitive science and linguistics at the University of California at Berkeley. (via For a Better Brain, Learn Another Language - The Atlantic)

(102 notas)

wildcat2030:

For a Better Brain, Learn Another Language
-
The cognitive benefits of multilingualism
-
There’s a certain sinking feeling one gets when thinking of the perfect thing to say just a moment too late. Perhaps a witty parting word could have made all the difference. There is no English word to express this feeling, but the French have the term l’esprit de l’escalier—translated, “stairwell wit”—for this very phenomenon. Nor is there an English word to describe the binge eating that follows an emotional blow, but the Germans have kummerspeck—“grief-bacon”—to do just that. If we had the Swedish word lagom—which means something is just right—the English explanation of Goldilocks’ perfectly temperate soup could have been a lot more succinct. Or the term koi no yokan, a poetic Japanese turn of phrase that expresses the feeling of knowing that you will soon fall in love with the person you have just met. It’s not love at first sight so much as an understanding that love is inevitable. Keats and Byron could have really used a word like that. There are many words that English speakers don’t have. Sometimes Anglophones take from other languages, but often, we have to explain our way around a specific feeling or emotion that doesn’t have its own word, never quite touching on it exactly. “The reason why we borrow words like savoir faire from French is because it’s not part of the culture [in the United States] and therefore that word did not evolve as part of our language,” says George Lakoff, a professor of cognitive science and linguistics at the University of California at Berkeley. (via For a Better Brain, Learn Another Language - The Atlantic)

"“Cognitive traps,” or simple mistakes in spelling or comprehension that our brains tend to make when taking linguistic shortcuts (such as how you can easily read “tihs senetcne taht is trerilby msispleld”), are better avoided when one speaks multiple languages. Multi-linguals might also be better decision-makers. According to a new study, they are more resistant to conditioning and framing techniques, making them less likely to be swayed by such language in advertisements or political campaign speeches. Those who speak multiple languages have also been shown to be more self-aware spenders, viewing “hypothetical” and “real” money (the perceived difference between money on a credit card and money in cold, hard cash) more similarly than monolinguals."

(60 notas)

"More recently and perhaps most importantly, it’s been found that people who learn a second language, even in adulthood, can better avoid cognitive decline in old age. In fact, when everything else is controlled for, bilinguals who come down with dementia and Alzheimer’s do so about four-and-a-half years later than monolinguals. Dr. Thomas Bak, a lecturer in the philosophy, psychology, and language sciences department at the University of Edinburgh, conducted the study and found that level of education and intelligence mattered less than learning a second language when it came to delaying cognitive decline. “It’s not the good memory that bilinguals have that is delaying cognitive decline,” Bak told me. “It’s their attention mechanism. Their ability to focus in on the details of language.”
Polyglots tend to be good at paying attention in a wide variety of ways, especially when performing visual tasks (like searching a scene or a list for a specific name or object) and when multitasking, which, according to Bak’s theory, is likely improved thanks to the practice of mentally switching between one’s native and foreign language while learning the foreign language."

(81 notas)

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: “I Just Cannot Believe It”
Photo by Diane Marshman; New Milford, Pennsylvania, USA

(359 notas)

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: “I Just Cannot Believe It”

Photo by Diane Marshman; New Milford, Pennsylvania, USA